Monthly Archives: September 2017

Pet Vaccinations

For pets the types or frequency can vary from species to species as dogs, cats, horses, etc. each have different needs. Yet. it is to be noted that there are mutated versions of some disease that while they may be primarily a dog issue, may affect a feline – and vice versa

Common Vaccinations for Dogs

As mentioned, the vaccine action needed depends on the pet species. For canines, the primary shots you need to be concerned about include: canine parvovirus, distemper, canine hepatitis and rabies are considered core vaccines. Non-core vaccines are given depending on the dog’s exposure risk. These include vaccines against Bordetella bronchiseptica, Borrelia burgdorferi and Leptospira bacteria.

Common Vaccinations for Cats

Your feline friends has other needs. Talk to your vet about scheduling these pet vaccinations: panleukopenia (feline distemper), feline calicivirus, feline herpesvirus type I (rhinotracheitis) and rabies are considered core vaccines. Non-core vaccines are given depending on the cat’s lifestyle; these include vaccines for feline leukemia virus, Bordetella, Chlamydophila felis and feline immunodeficiency virus.

It should be noted that while these are all the commonly suggested pet vaccinations, that not every pet will be on the same schedule. For instance, if a puppy’s mother was healthy and then nursed the puppies, then some of the shots can be delayed. For cats who are nursed by a healthy mother whose immune system is strong, it is typically not necessary to begin vaccinations until your kitten is as much as 8 weeks old. Once your kitten or puppy reaches adulthood, it generally not necessary to vaccinate your pet but once every 3 years.

However, do be sure to talk to you veterinarian as there are some diseases that may be more common in your region, and thus require you to have your pet inoculated for some diseases more frequently then mentioned here. Also, as with human immunizations, there are often side effects that will need to watch for. Be sure to ask your vet of any specific indicators that your pet has had a reaction.

You Should Know Before Getting a Pet

Some important factors for rearing pets are discussed below:

1. It’s a Long-term Commitment

When you decide to offer a pet home, remember it should be for the pet’s lifetime. Responsible pet ownership also means committing to take care the pet through their sickness and health. The average lifespan of dogs and cats is around 12 years, with some dogs and cats living until 15 or even 20 years. Everyone wants puppies and kittens because they are unbearably adorable, but you should also be prepared to take care of them as they grow up.

2. Spend Enough Time

Caring for a pet takes a considerable amount of time every day. Exercise, socialization, grooming, feeding, reward-based training, play time and providing company and attention are all critical aspects of pet ownership.

3. Expect the Unexpected

Breaking and throwing things. Chewing your favorite plants. Scratching the furniture. Most of us never expect to face these behaviours from our pets before bringing them home. Relax, they don’t do it out of anger or spiteful reasons and the good news is these behaviours can be managed. Bringing a pet into your home is like having a toddler. When young they can be a little destructive until they are taught not to be in the nicest possible way.

4.Costs of Pet Ownership

The costs of pet ownership will vary depending on the type of animal you choose. Remember that pets are an addition to the family and costs like vaccination, desexing, food, deworming, health checks, vet bills are also involved with pet ownership. If an emergency or accident occurs, you will be responsible to pay for any emergency veterinary treatment if required.

5.Fitting them into Your Lifestyle

Companion animals always depend on human company, so make sure your lifestyle can accommodate them. Taking regular trips away, a busy social life, long working hours or a home that does not allow having pets these are some of the factors that need to be considered beforehand.

 

Heartworms From Effecting Pets

This disease is spread through an infected mosquito bite. In dogs, heartworm disease is treatable, but it is very painful and expensive. While there are no authorized products for heartworm treatments in cats. Fleas are bloodsucking parasites that transmit tapeworms can result in flea allergy dermatitis (FAD). Hence, it is advised to prevent heartworms and fleas in pets.

Some facts about Heartworms

  • Heartworm disease affects dogs, cats and a maximum of thirty other mammal species.
  • This disease spreads through parasitic worms residing in the major lung vessels and at times in the hearts.
  • This disease can cause wide array of problems affecting the heart, liver, lungs and kidneys of the pets. In some extreme cases, it can even lead to death.
  • In cats, heartworms can result in respiratory disorder that imitates feline asthma. But there is no approved treatment of heartworms in cats.
  • Heartworm disease is 100% preventable but still there are many pets who are diagnosed with this disease every year.
  • There are more than 25% heartworm infected cats that live indoors.

Prevention of Heartworm disease

It is recommended to give Sentinel Spectrum as a heartworm preventive treatment for dogs. It is one of the best treatments available for dogs that provides 100% heartworm prevention guarantee, along with prevention of four other intestinal parasites including: hookworms, roundworms, tapeworms and whipworms. It even aids in preventing fleas from laying eggs, thus controlling flea infestations.

Fleas can lead to critical problems in dogs and cats. Some of the adverse reactions of fleas on pets include: continuous itching and scratching, hair loss, scabs, skin damage and skin infection. It is also known as Flea Allergy Dermatitis (FAD).

Some facts about fleas

  • Fleas can not only affect pets, but also human beings.
  • Fleas can transmit tapeworms to pets and people.
  • They play a significant role in spreading cat-scratch fever disease between cats and humans.
  • Fleas can suck lots of blood from the pets that it can result in weakening and even life-grievous anemia.
  • Fleas can be seen nearly anywhere in the year. But they are less prevalent in colder months